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Department of Energy Releases Draft Plan to Explore Options for Meeting National Energy Demand



The Department of Energy (DOE) has issued two draft National Interest Electric Transmission Corridor Designations, based on the findings of DOE’s National Electric Transmission Congestion Study (Congestion Study), to designate National Corridors.


By CleanLink Editorial Staff   Design & Construction

The Department of Energy (DOE) has issued two draft National Interest Electric Transmission Corridor Designations, based on the findings of DOE’s National Electric Transmission Congestion Study (Congestion Study), to designate National Corridors.

The draft national corridors are comprised of two geographic areas where consumers are currently adversely affected by transmission capacity constraints or congestion. The proposed Mid-Atlantic Area National Corridor includes counties in Ohio, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, New York, Maryland, Virginia, and all of New Jersey, Delaware, and the District of Columbia. The proposed Southwest Area National Corridor includes counties in California, Arizona and Nevada.

“These draft designations set us on the path to modernize our constrained and congested electric power infrastructure.  They are a crucial step toward realizing President Bush’s goal of a modern, more efficient electric power delivery system,” says Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman. “I am confident the Department’s actions will help facilitate the infrastructure growth necessary to meet the demands of our growing economy.”

DOE says the draft national corridors is intended to encourage a full consideration of all options available to meet local, regional and national demand, which includes more local generation, transmission capacity, demand response and energy efficiency measures. DOE is not directing the construction of new transmission in a certain area, nor is it determining the route for any proposed transmission project.

These draft national corridors are designed to be large enough to help facilitate access to a range of possible generation sources that could serve the congested area and they preserve the options of state authorities and private companies to determine which generation sources are of principal interest, DOE says. The draft national corridors are broad enough to allow consideration of a range of potential transmission projects and routes by the appropriate transmission planning entities, siting authorities (e.g., State agencies and, under certain conditions, the FERC), and prospective transmission developers.


A 60-day comment period will begin the day draft National Corridor designations are published in the Federal Register. During the comment period, DOE will confer with affected States and will hold the following three public meetings: Washington, D.C. on May 15; San Diego, Calif. on May 17; and New York on May 23.




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  posted on 4/30/2007   Article Use Policy




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