Home of Building Operating Management & Facility Maintenance Decisions
Insider Reports

FacilitiesNet eNewsletter
eNews Best Information Tool For Busy FMs
We will keep you updated with trends, education, strategies, insights & benchmarks to help drive your career & project success.
Sign up for eBook




KEY FM TOPICS

News

Software Interoperability Likely to Increase, Survey Says



Adoption of building information modeling (BIM) and Integrated Project Delivery will drive the software market to greater interoperability between applications, according to a recent report.


By CP Editorial Staff   Software

Adoption of building information modeling (BIM) and Integrated Project Delivery will drive the software market to greater interoperability between applications, according to a recent report.

Surveying 295 architects, engineers, contractors and owners, the study aimed to assess the interoperability of software applications and platforms serving the building community.

According to the survey, 41 percent of respondents perceive improved interoperability as one of the reasons for using BIM.

“An overarching goal of BIM is to create a dynamic model of a building that can be used by the entire building team through the building’s lifecycle. As a result, BIM drives demand for interoperability,” the survey says.

In the U.S. the global construction output in 2006 was $1.2 trillion.  The survey found lack of interoperability impacts scheduling and causes redundancy when data has to be manually re-entered, all of which affect productivity.

“Build team estimate that interoperability issues contribute 3.1 percent to a typical project budget,” the survey says.

While existing software companies will respond to this need in their time, the situation creates an opportunity for new companies to create software that will be compatible with a wider array of other applications out of the box, the survey says.

The survey was sponsored by several organizations, including the International Code Council, the Construction Specifications Institute and the American Institute of Architects.  



Contact FacilitiesNet Editorial Staff »

  posted on 11/26/2007   Article Use Policy

Comments