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Facility Maintenance Decisions

CMMS: How to Implement Condition-Based Monitoring





By Kris Bagadia   Software

OTHER PARTS OF THIS ARTICLEPt. 1: CMMS: Use Software to Manage Energy UsePt. 2: CMMS Upgrades: What Modules Do You Need?Pt. 3: CMMS: Data Can Uncover Energy DeficienciesPt. 4: This Page

Implementing condition-based monitoring is another important step in taking full advantage of a CMMS to reach higher levels of sustainability. A CMMS that triggers corrective work orders and PM schedules based on energy-use levels can greatly reduce energy use by equipment. An important fact to remember is the system's users can define these conditions, meaning they can set minimum and maximum values. Once they set those parameters, the CMMS triggers corrective actions based on those values.

Condition-based monitoring is particularly useful for PM activities. One example might involve the CMMS triggering a PM action based on an air-handling unit's run-time hours. This strategy can greatly increase the overall efficiency of a PM program, as well as the mechanical systems as a whole.

Based on CMMS data and analysis, managers also can perform other tasks to enhance their facilities' sustainability, such as creating or enforcing recycling programs, examining their facilities' carbon footprint by reviewing energy use, and addressing pollution problems.

Enhanced efficiency in facility operations will result in lower energy use and maintenance costs, and it will help reduce emissions. Understanding the link between the CMMS and energy performance can be an essential step in helping organizations meet their sustainability goals, so it is important that managers put strategies in place to maximize the benefits of both the CMMS and the BAS.

If organizations can recognize and take advantage of the link between maintenance and energy, practices related to both maintenance management and energy management are likely to become more efficient and successful.

Kris Bagadia is a consultant, an educator, and president of PEAK Industrial Solutions LLC.


Continue Reading: CMMS: Tracking Sustainability

CMMS: Use Software to Manage Energy Use

CMMS Upgrades: What Modules Do You Need?

CMMS: Data Can Uncover Energy Deficiencies

CMMS: How to Implement Condition-Based Monitoring



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  posted on 4/1/2011   Article Use Policy

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