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NEMA Announces Effort to Limit Mercury in CFLs



Lighting company members of the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) have announced that they are making a voluntary commitment to cap the amount of mercury present in compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs).


By CleanLink Editorial Staff   Green

Lighting company members of the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) have announced that they are making a voluntary commitment to cap the amount of mercury present in compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs).

"This should help policy makers and the consumer public fully understand the electrical manufacturing community's determination to be leaders in environmental stewardship while maintaining the highest standards of product safety and performance," says Evan Gaddis, NEMA president.

The reduction would apply to CFLs for sale for typical residential use in the United States, according to NEMA, which says the change is consistent with NEMA's Call to Action on hazardous substances.

The voluntary commitment, effective April 15, states that NEMA members will cap the total mercury content in CFLs of less than 25 watts at 5 milligrams (mg) per unit. The total mercury content of CFLs that use 25 to 40 watts of electricity will be capped at 6 mg per unit.

Mercury is an essential element in CFLs and allows the bulb to be an efficient light source. The additional milligram for lamps of 25 to 40 watts is needed to operate these higher-wattage lamps for higher light-output demands in the United States, NEMA says.

NEMA CFL manufacturers will, nonetheless, continue to work to reduce the amount of mercury and other hazardous substances in their products.

"NEMA's Call to Action on hazardous substances, puts the organization firmly on record as a champion of reducing and, where possible, eliminating hazardous substances in electrical products," Gaddis says. "Industry, the government, and retail consumers can do their part by replacing less-efficient lamps with CFLs where possible, thus contributing to an overall reduction in mercury emissions through the consequent reduction in energy demand and associated power plant emissions."




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  posted on 3/14/2007   Article Use Policy




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