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Maryland Adopts New NFPA Codes



The state of Maryland has adopted the most recent editions of NFPA 1, Uniform Fire Code and NFPA 101, Life Safety Code. The latest edition of NFPA 70, National Electrical CodeĀ® and several other NFPA documents were also adopted by the state and all became effective Jan. 1.


The state of Maryland has adopted the most recent editions of NFPA 1, Uniform Fire Code™ and NFPA 101®, Life Safety Code.  The latest edition of NFPA 70, National Electrical Code® and several other NFPA documents were also adopted by the state and all became effective Jan. 1.

“Maryland ’s implementation of the latest editions of NFPA 1, NFPA 101 and several other documents provides us with the tools necessary to continue providing the highest level of protection for the people of our state,” says William E. Barnard, Maryland state fire marshal.

Maryland has already participated in a training program developed by NFPA and offered to states that have adopted NFPA 1, NFPA 101 and other key NFPA codes and standards. Taught by NFPA technical experts, the training covers all of the codes’ requirements and the numerous ways they can be utilized and enforced. This training and the associated codebooks are free to government code enforcement officials.

Adopted statewide in 20 states, NFPA 1, Uniform Fire Code provides requirements necessary to establish a reasonable level of fire safety and property protection from hazards created by fire and explosion. Its primary purposes are to address basic fire prevention requirements and to reference or extract the fire prevention and protection aspects of many other NFPA codes and standards.

NFPA’s Life Safety Code, used in every U.S. state and adopted statewide in 39 states, sets minimum building design, construction, operation, and maintenance requirements necessary to protect building occupants from dangers caused by fire, smoke, and toxic fumes. The Life Safety Code also provides prompt escape requirements for new and existing buildings.


posted on 1/11/2007

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