Building Operating Management

Most-Often Misunderstood or Misapplied IBC Requirement for Commercial Interiors





What is one of the most-often misunderstood or misapplied IBC requirements for commercial interiors?

Clarifications were made to a section of the code that will hopefully serve to improve how to treat intervening rooms and spaces in exit systems. Being one of the most misunderstood or misapplied sections of the code, this section deals with how intervening rooms or spaces are treated. The code now clearly states that egress through an enclosed elevator lobby is permitted. It remains that egress shall not pass through kitchens, storerooms, or closets but it does NOT limit the number of intervening or adjoining rooms through which egress can be made, provided that all other code requirements are met. A common mistake in office planning is locating a second required exit through a kitchen or break room, which is prohibited by the code.

Answers provided by Kimberly A. Marks, ASID, NCIDQ. Marks is a registered interior designer and president of The Marks Design Group.


Continue Reading: Ask An Expert: Kimberly Marks, Interiors

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  posted on 7/13/2015   Article Use Policy




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