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New Appliance Standards Could Slash Energy Use

New national appliance standards for 26 common household and business products could slash total U.S. electricity use by over 1,900 terawatt-hours (1.9 trillion kilowatt-hours) cumulatively by 2030 while saving consumers and businesses over $123 billion, according to a report by the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) and the Appliance Standards Awareness Project (ASAP).

Energy Efficiency   Article Use Policy

New national appliance standards for 26 common household and business products could slash total U.S. electricity use by over 1,900 terawatt-hours (1.9 trillion kilowatt-hours) cumulatively by 2030 while saving consumers and businesses over $123 billion, according to a report by the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) and the Appliance Standards Awareness Project (ASAP).
 
The new standards will affect many common household and business products — ranging from furnaces to water heaters to air conditioners to fluorescent light bulbs. In many cases, standards first set in the 1980s or 1990s are due to be updated and can now be strengthened thanks to technological improvements.
 
About half the total energy savings would come from new standards for fluorescent lights, water heaters, home furnaces, furnace fans, and refrigerators.
 
The new standards also could contribute to U.S. efforts to cut global warming carbon dioxide pollution, eliminating 158 million tons per year by 2030, roughly the amount emitted by 63 large conventional coal-fired power plants.
 
On Feb. 5, President Obama made appliance standards a priority by issuing a presidential memorandum urging the DOE to meet and beat legal deadlines for new standards.
 
The federal appliance standards program, in effect since 1987, sets minimum appliance, equipment, and lighting efficiency standards for products manufactured in or imported to the U.S.

posted on 7/23/2009



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