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Facility Maintenance Decisions

Housekeeping: How to Properly Clean Toilets and Urinals





When these jobs are done, it is time for cleaners to begin work on restroom components that often are the main culprits in poor hygiene — toilets and urinals. The cleaning process involves using bowl cleaners and a brush or swab. Using a swab will help cleaners reduce the flicking of water that can occur when using a toilet brush.

The first thing crews should do when cleaning a toilet is push the water out of the fixture down over the trap, then apply the bowl cleaner to the swab and clean the inside of the bowl cavity, including the flush ring. Cleaners should avoid working on the outside of the bowl or the seat at this stage. They already should have pre-sprayed these areas with the disinfectant cleaner and cleaned them in the same manner.

Urinals require a similar cleaning method as toilet bowls, though in most cases, cleaners do not need to drain any water. Again, they should use a bowl cleaner only in the cavity of the urinal, not on the outside. They should pre-spray a disinfectant on the exterior as a first step, allow an appropriate amount of dwell time, and wipe it clean as a last step.

When the housekeeper finishes using the bowl cleaner in the toilet bowl and the urinal, he or she should flush the unit, rinse out the swab with clean water, and wipe any spills that might have occurred. In some cases, the cleaner will need to change the urinal screen and urinal block.

Bowl cleaners are available in three different varieties: heavy-duty acid, mild acid, and non-acid. Managers should choose a bowl cleaner based on the type cleaning required. In some cases, very hard water might require heavy-duty acid, but in most cases, a mild or non-acid bowl cleaner is adequate.


Continue Reading: Restroom Hygiene: A Clean Record

Housekeeping: Use the Right Amount of Disinfectant

Housekeeping: How to Properly Clean Toilets and Urinals

Housekeeping: How to Properly Clean Restroom Floors



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  posted on 6/30/2011   Article Use Policy

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