Home of Building Operating Management & Facility Maintenance Decisions
Insider Reports

FacilitiesNet eNewsletter
eNews Best Information Tool For Busy FMs
We will keep you updated with trends, education, strategies, insights & benchmarks to help drive your career & project success.
Sign up for eBook




KEY FM TOPICS

News

Air Force Base Settles with EPA on Fuel Tanks



An air force base in New Jersey is complying with measures required by federal law to prevent leaks of it underground storage tanks under a settlement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). McGuire AFB in New Hanover Township, N.J., started fixing the problems once the EPA identified deficiencies during a 2002 inspection.


An air force base in New Jersey is complying with measures required by federal law to prevent leaks of it underground storage tanks under a settlement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). McGuire AFB in New Hanover Township, N.J., started fixing the problems once the EPA identified deficiencies during a 2002 inspection.

Under the terms of the agreement, the U.S. Air Force, New Jersey Air National Guard, and the Army and Air Force Exchange Service also will pay a penalty of $115,000 for the violations. The military installed proper corrosion protection, overfill protection and lead-detection equipment, and it has improved annual testing and record-keeping at the 20 federally regulated tank systems it uses to store fuel for vehicles at the base.

Underground storage tanks historically have been the nation’s number one source of groundwater contamination, with more than 30,000 leaks and spills from tanks reported annually. Tanks range in capacity from a few hundred to 50,000 or more gallons. They store gasoline, diesel, heating oil and other fuels, waste oil, and hazardous substances at gas stations, marinas, government facilities, and large industrial sites. Petroleum releases can contaminate drinking water from groundwater sources, making them unsafe or unpleasant to drink. Releases also can cause fire and explosion hazards and produce short- and long-term health effects.

The EPA regulations require owners and operators to maintain underground storage tanks to avoid releases into the environment. The regulations also require owners and operators to clean up leaks to restore and protect groundwater resources and to provide a safe environment for those who live or work around these sites.

For more information about EPA’s underground storage tank program, click here.




Contact FacilitiesNet Editorial Staff »

  posted on 11/9/2006   Article Use Policy

Comments