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Snow and Ice Removal: Identify Equipment Options

pickup trucks, snowplows, spreaders, snow and ice

This is Chris Matt, Associate Editor of Maintenance Solutions magazine. Today’s tip is building an equipment arsenal for snow and ice removal:

Equipment for removing snow and ice depends on the job. But grounds managers must specify a range of products and equipment to make sure crews have the tools to handle any task. Equipment options include the following items:

Pickup trucks. Pickups serve as general utility vehicles for shovel or deicing crews, and workers can use attachments to turn them into plows.

Snowplows. Snowplows are an obvious need for any grounds crew, but it’s surprising how many options managers must consider. When considering a pickup truck, managers can specify straight blades, V-plows or box plows.

Spreaders. The best advice when specifying a spreader is to understand the department’s objectives for managing a location and buying equipment to meet those demands. Options can include tailgate or V-box spreaders.

Skid-steer loaders. These units are becoming a must for many departments because they tend to be tougher and more maneuverable than pickup trucks. They are useful in tight spaces, and workers can use them in conjunction with a containment plow.

Utility vehicles. These are strong snow and ice management tools because manufacturers have rolled out many attachments for plowing and deicing.

And finally, front-end loaders and tractors. Departments typically use these pieces of equipment with a large plow or box plow for bigger jobs. They require coordination with smaller pieces of equipment, such as a pickup truck, for cleanup in tight areas.

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