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<< Windows & Exterior Walls



PROSOCO: Product Achieves 10-Year Proven Performance


5/21/2015

 

Lawrence, Kan. – May 19, 2015 — PROSOCO’s R-Guard FastFlash, a liquid flashing membrane that weatherproofs rough openings, has achieved a first in the industry – its durability has been independently verified over a 10-year span.

In 2005, FastFlash was used on the Renaissance Condominiums in Seattle, in a whole-structure building envelope remediation project by Tatley-Grund Building Repair Specialists.

In February 2015, the product was verified to be performing as intended by OAC Services, a building enclosure consulting firm. The report from OAC Services states:

“We found no adverse conditions related to the use of this product to any of the materials observed. All surfaces were dry and in good condition. We found no degradation of the FastFlash product used within the assembly.”

This milestone has been long-awaited by the industry, said Dave Pennington, building envelope group manager for PROSOCO.

“Now FastFlash is the only fluid-applied flashing material in the industry that can show 10-year historical performance data,” Pennington said. “This provides confidence to applicators and specifiers while separating PROSOCO from the many followers just entering the market.”

The observations made by OAC Services went much further than a cursory review. To access the wall assembly and verify the performance of FastFlash, the siding and window were removed in a unit on the southwest corner of the building. This allowed for the observation of the wall sheathing and rough opening. An opening was also made on the interior of the building below the window to observe the condition of the wall cavity.

The southwest corner of the building in particular was selected for its maximum exposure to the weather. In Seattle, severe weather patterns of wind and rain typically hit the south and west elevations of buildings more frequently than others.

For more information, visit prosoco.com.

 


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