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Roof Restoration at Home of NFL’s Detroit Lions Enhances Energy Efficiency

© Bmosh99 | Dreamstime.com - Ford Field Photo



Dave Lubach November 10, 2016 - Roofing

Roofing decisions are among the toughest for maintenance and engineering managers to make when it comes to deciding whether to replace, repair or restore a roof. Less than 15 years into its existence the officials at Ford Field, home of the NFL’s Detroit Lions, were facing such a decision.

The domed roof at Ford Field measures 340,000 square feet and was restored by Tremco Roofing and Building Maintenance with a two-coat AlphaGuard BIO fluid applied roofing system. The project was completed in three months over the summer before the preseason schedule started. The roof membrane and insulation in damaged areas was replaced and also cleaned to prepare for coating.

For another look at a roofing project at a sports facility, click here to read about a re-roofing project at Arizona State University.

Restoration was recommended because the process is more sustainable because the existing roof membrane is upgraded and not torn off and sent to landfills. Restoration also produces significant reductions in cost.

“The cost effective and sustainability-focused approach enabled us to spend wisely on a solution that provides protection while minimizing material ending up in a landfill,” says Todd Argust, the Lions’ vice president of operations.

The benefits of a roof restoration, according to a press release, include: adding 20 years to a roof’s life; keeping the building watertight while adopting a plan for possible replacement in the future; and tax benefits.

This quick read was submitted by Dave Lubach, associate editor for Facility Maintenance Decisions. Reach him at dave.lubach@tradepress.com.

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