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Variety of Carpet Options Can Earn LEED Points

December 6, 2011 - Flooring

In the world of carpet, capturing LEED points is a viable goal in a variety of categories. MR in LEED for New Construction (NC) is one example. LEED points for carpet selection can be gained by focusing on reuse, such as mandating the use of existing interior nonstructural floor covering elements in at least 50 percent of the completed building. The premise is to extend product lifecycles, conserve resources, retain cultural resources and reduce waste.

Up to two points are available under MR in LEED-NC if the project diverts construction and demolition debris from disposal in landfills and incineration facilities. The motivation is to re-direct recyclable recovered resources back to the manufacturing process and reusable materials to appropriate sites. Facility managers can help work toward LEED points regarding the use of carpet by mandating the recycling or salvaging of nonhazardous construction and demolition debris, establishing goals for diversion from disposal in landfills and incineration facilities, and adopting a construction waste management program. Still another one to two points can be had in the MR section if flooring materials are reused. Salvaged, refurbished or reused materials should constitute at least 5 percent of the total value of materials on the project. Materials with recycled content that make up at least 10 percent of the cost of the project materials also help capture LEED points.

Wood products have received a lot of attention lately, thanks to import issues from China. For LEED credits, points are available to encourage environmentally responsible forest management. In just one of several criteria dedicated to wood, LEED parameters require using a minimum of 50 percent (based on costs) of wood-based materials and products that are certified in accordance with the Forest Stewardship Council's principles and criteria for wood building components.


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