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Environmental Considerations of Selecting Ceilings




May 3, 2012 - Ceilings, Furniture & Walls

This is Casey Laughman, managing editor of Building Operating Management. Today's tip is to consider the environmental impact of a new ceiling.

The idea that removing a ceiling would make a space more sustainable encouraged the move to open plenum spaces. The thinking was that facilities could gain sustainability by using fewer materials.

What's more, building owners interested in LEED certification often focused on other components, such as energy-saving HVAC systems, because a building's acoustical attributes haven't been included in the certification. He adds that this may change with the U.S. Green Building Council's Pilot Credit 24, which focuses on acoustics in new construction and commercial interiors.

Perceptions aside, there is evidence that ceilings can reduce the environmental impact of a space, in addition to providing acoustical benefits that can improve indoor environmental quality. A study by the Ceilings & Interior Systems Construction Association compared an area's energy use with a suspended ceiling and an open plenum. Researchers found that installing a suspended ceiling saved between 9 and 17 percent of energy costs.

Many high performance acoustical ceilings are highly light reflective. For instance, a ceiling with a 90 percent light reflectance reflects 90 percent of the light from its surface back into the room. That means fewer light fixtures are needed.

Over the past several years, one focus of indoor air quality has been to reduce or eliminate the amount of volatile organic compounds and formaldehyde in a space. However, while it's possible to reduce the amount of formaldehyde in a facility, some still occurs naturally. In addition, it's a component of some cleaning solutions. To counter this, a new type of ceiling tile incorporates a coating that removes formaldehyde.

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